milestone-trailer-leasing-containers

Are Trailers the Next Big Warehousing Trend?

Shippers turn to alternative storage options as they seek to manage inventory headaches.

Companies and warehouse providers are scrambling for creative solutions to overcome a lack of warehouse space as they revamp supply chain networks to embrace e-commerce expectations.

The amount of available U.S. warehousing and logistics space sits at a multiyear low, according to real estate researcher CBRE Group. In the fourth quarter of 2018, availability for industrial real estate fell to its lowest level since 2000, the 34th consecutive quarter of decline.

Equipment providers and startups are stepping in to supplement the traditional warehouse market, from temporary trailers to Airbnb-style matchmakers that bring warehouse space and inventory together.

Mobile storage fills the gaps

Companies like Milestone Equipment Holdings lease dry van trailers as temporary storage space. It’s been an ad hoc practice in the past as a warehouse manager scrambled to accommodate inventory spikes.

The temporary trailers — which may be used for years — allow companies to scale their warehouse space based on demand. Some companies moved imports up to beat rising tariffs or geared up for holidays or promotions.

“Some inventory needs to be mobile so they’re keeping it on the trailers, but then they’re moving the trailers where they need them,” Don Ake, vice president of commercial vehicles at FTR Transportation Intelligence, told Supply Chain Dive.

Now temporary or on-demand space is becoming a long-term factor in warehouse strategies for e-commerce, as companies revamp their supply chains to support fulfillment and fast delivery

“For our traditional customer base, it’s difficult to access warehouse space, to find enough of it in small quantities across the country to meet the compressed delivery time expectations that’s now transitioning into the B2B world as well,” Sarah Johnson, executive vice president of mobile warehousing and storage for Milestone, told Supply Chain Dive.

Milestone has a fleet of nearly 60,000 trailers and can dispatch a storage trailer within 48 hours from one of its 25 U.S. branch locations. Trailers available for storage include 53-foot and 48-foot dry vans with roll-up or swing doors. Johnson said the cost of storage in trailers could be up to 50% less than brick-and-mortar warehouse space.

milestone-trailer-leasing-national-map

Companies are also tapping trailers for reverse logistics. One national retailer has used about 1,000 of Milestone’s trailers to store returned goods.

“We’re helping them think about our trailers more in terms of real estate as opposed to a trailer,” Johnson said “Temporary storage represents a good opportunity for companies to try different solutions before they commit their capital or find a substantial term lease for warehouse space, which is tough to come by now.”

In response to the demands of e-commerce, retailers are reconfiguring distribution to be closer to consumers for faster delivery time. The mobile warehouses help shippers transition from large distribution centers in low-cost outlying areas to smaller sites in more expensive urban areas.

To read to full article, click here

SOURCE: Supply Chain Dive

Chassis

JOC: Difficult solutions to US chassis chaos emerge

Containers and chassis have a symbiotic relationship in the supply chain, so intertwined that freight grinds to a halt when the two are out of sync. The chassis is a linchpin between on-time deliveries and delays, as most recently shown when shippers front-loaded cargo in December to avoid potential US tariffs in January. Equipment shortages arose in January in Los Angeles; Long Beach; Chicago; and Memphis, Tennessee.

The problem is simple even if the solutions are not. Lowering trigger thresholds, building a strategic chassis reserve, and constructing a truly open chassis network would mean higher bills for beneficial cargo owners (BCOs).

The first two options would require more equipment, which could idle for months and months, depreciating in value without generating any return on invested capital. The final idea would also disrupt the exclusive deals between ocean carriers and chassis providers to provide competitive rates to BCOs. Each, though, can prompt a well-deserved discussion on how to stop the equipment shortages from happening time and time again.

The issue boils down to an idiom: you don’t build the church for Easter Sunday. To do so would be a great customer service decision but a poor business one.

Chassis providers are trying to solve the problem by adding more equipment annually.

By the end of 2018, Direct ChassisLink, Inc. (DCLI) had purchased 5,600 marine chassis, upgraded more than 27,000 pool chassis with radial tires, and converted 80 percent of the fleet to LED lights. DCLI has invested $45 million to upgrade its existing fleet and spends millions each year in repairing broken chassis.

TRAC Intermodal bought nearly 8,000 chassis in 2018 and refurbished another 8,000.

Flexi-Van Leasing built more than 4,000 units in 2018 and upgraded 15,000 with radials and LEDs across the country. It also plans to continue to add radial and LEDs and recondition older units.

Demurrage and detention/per diem penalties, nevertheless, have skyrocketed in recent years. In 2014, fees from ocean carriers surged 90 percent. In 2015, they rose another 86 percent because of West Coast port strikes, according to the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC).

After a decline in 2016, penalties rose 30 percent in 2017 to about the same total as 2015. Terminal operator demurrage rates show a similar trend, according to the FMC.

Much of the shortage goes back to when the ocean carriers exited the chassis business — sort of. Evergreen and Matson are the only major ocean carriers still using their own chassis; others tie the hands of truckers by signing exclusive deals with chassis providers. The benefit is that BCOs pay very little for a chassis, but the downside is the ocean carrier keeps its hand firmly in the game by dictating which equipment must be used.

When those limited options are unavailable, terminal and container demurrage quickly follows. Thousands of dollars in unnecessary penalties are racked up per shipper because the terminal becomes a storage yard and a trucker is forbidden from using its own chassis.

Not all demurrage is tied to chassis shortages or union strikes. Fees are also tied to poor weather, customs inspections, or congestion issues. Finding a better chassis business model, however, could reduce the frequency of penalties and minimize disruptions.

Given chronic congestion in Southern California; New York and New Jersey; Norfolk, Virginia; Charleston, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; Memphis, Tennessee; and Chicago, everyone benefits by eliminating chassis availability as a contributing factor.

“There is no one problem to be solved across all markets. Each market is unique and faces a different set of supply chain-driven circumstances that can lead to intermodal inefficiencies. Looking for a ‘one size fits all’ solution that is solely focused on chassis will not meet the complex needs of ports and inland intermodal hubs,” DCLI said in a statement to JOC.com.

So, what is the answer? Should shippers hold enough chassis in inventory for the worst-case scenario even if they go unused for months?

Lower the stress-trigger threshold

Every chassis pool administrator establishes a utilization percentage that, when exceeded, requires equipment providers to add more units as soon as possible. It’s a trigger signifying a pool is stressed.

Utilization percentages require some complicated calculations, including how long BCOs hold on to chassis, but it’s a figure that factors in broken equipment. So, if 5 percent of chassis require maintenance and repair, the utilization percentage drops to 95 percent.

There is no uniform trigger point covering all ports and inland rail locations. In some markets, that trigger may be 85 percent. Port officials in Savannah, Georgia, and Charleston, South Carolina, convinced Consolidated Chassis Management (CCM) to lower its trigger from 80 percent to 75 percent. Triggers might be reset at 75 percent in the Gulf and interior hubs such as Chicago and Memphis, according to sources.

Jim Newsome, CEO of the South Carolina Ports Authority, believes the proper trigger should be 70 percent.

“The penalty for not having a chassis is huge. You’re into expensive demurrage of $100 or $150 per day, delays in terminals, and bobtails,” he said. “The idea that you cut the chassis fleet as close as you can to perfection doesn’t make sense to me. Shaving the chassis fleet to the bare minimum necessary drives inefficiencies in the supply chain.”

Some of the utilization problems are the BCOs’ own doing. In January, the chassis supply at the Port of New York and New Jersey was lower than usual as dwell times — the time a chassis is out on the street — went up among BCOs. TRAC sent a bulletin to customers urging them to return long-dwelling equipment, some of which it claimed as out for more than 15 days.

The Pacific Merchant Shipping Association reported dwell times in November averaged 3.5 days, up from 2.5 days last spring. About 13 percent of chassis were out on the street for five or more days, up from 5 percent last spring.

Building a reserve fleet

Another idea is establishing a reserve fleet in cases of emergency similar to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve — an emergency supply of crude oil in barrels located underground in Louisiana and Texas.

This is similar to a lower trigger point because both would require providers to increase the supply of chassis in the United States. Purchasing new chassis, however, is getting more expensive because of tariffs on Chinese-made units and rising US steel prices because of tariffs.

TRAC has been pivoting toward this idea with what it calls a “safety stock inventory.” Extra roadable chassis are stored in key markets but not placed into active use until its pool is stressed.

“[The chassis] may sit months or even an entire year and never move. We’re willing to make the investment in anticipation of spikes in demand,” said Val Noel, TRAC’s chief operating officer (COO).

Flexi-Van also has ready reserve units in large markets.

The problems with a reserve fleet are similar to lowering triggers.

Who pays for the new units? How often is the reserve used, and are the proper amounts deployed in the right locations?

An analogy is supplying water in supermarkets before a hurricane or blizzard. Pictures on television and social media show empty shelves, so why wouldn’t a supermarket always have enough water in stock? Under the supply chain model, a supermarket chain will transport essentials from other cities ahead of the storm. It doesn’t make financial sense to always carry gallons of water and pallets of batteries in inventory when such storms happen a few times per year.

The same applies to chassis. Is it smart for them to collect dust? It might be a wise customer service goal but an unwise and costly business decision.

“It’s a tough balancing act for us or anyone,” acknowledged Shawn Tibbetts, COO of the Virginia Port Authority, which owns the Hampton Roads Chassis Pool II. “We plan for the peak, but then we look at the valleys in demand as opportunities to upgrade the fleet, maintain it, and make the pool as efficient as possible.”

Gray pools are not truly open

Even in existing gray pools, also known as interoperable pools, the main contributors are TRAC Intermodal, DCLI, Flexi-Van Leasing, and the North American Chassis Pool Cooperative (NACPC).

Other chassis providers such as TAL International, Milestone Equipment Holdings, American Intermodal Management (AIM), and Star Leasing are permitted to contribute to gray pools, but it would make no sense.

Even if their equipment were used, they wouldn’t book the revenue under “box rules.” When a drayman uses a TRAC pool chassis on a Maersk Line container, DCLI actually gets the revenue. An electronic data interchange (EDI) message is sent when a trucker leaves the terminal. The equipment provider collecting the money is based on whose box is hauled. In the Maersk example, DCLI invoices the customer even though a TRAC pool chassis was used.

The revenue is even in the end because TRAC would collect revenue, for example, when a DCLI chassis is used on an APL container.

Since AIM, Milestone, and Star Leasing don’t have any contracts with ocean carriers; however, they wouldn’t be paid in the gray pool. They have their own depots. The clock begins when the chassis leaves and ends when it is returned. No EDI message is sent upon exiting the terminal.

One option would be to eliminate box rules to create a fully unrestricted open choice in CCM pools.

Flexi-Van fully supports the idea, but DCLI opposes it. DCLI told JOC.com that neither box rules nor choice improves or impedes availability, and neither is relevant to chassis supply.

Use the airport model

One way to even the playing field is to find ways to allow AIM, Milestone, Star, and TAL to better compete on daily rentals to truckers. A solution can be found in the airport car rental industry.

Currently, DCLI, TRAC, Flexi-Van, and CCM pools have “counters” and “cars” on the “airport” grounds, while AIM, Milestone, and Star Leasing are relegated to offsite properties. Naturally, any short-term user would use a provider on the airport grounds.

But at the Port of New York and New Jersey, traditional chassis providers have been kicked off terminal grounds. The same could occur in the future in Los Angeles.

Gene Seroka, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles, said moving chassis to near-dock sites would free up as much as 80 acres of terminal space for containers. The port has identified several parcels that could qualify and is exploring those options.

Nathanial Seeds, CEO of AIM, said he would consider establishing a joint off-site location if more ports end up doing the same. The idea is co-locating outsiders in a building near the traditional pool depot. Each would have a counter and a lot, similar to how Avis, Budget, Hertz, and other rental car companies co-habitate in an airport. In this case, AIM, Milestone, Star, and TAL are the rental companies.

“If the chassis providers were no longer on the terminal grounds, this proposal would make sense. You would be competing on service, quality, price, and innovation like the car rental companies. We know the chassis space needs this desperately,” Seeds said.

Southern States model

One proposed model championed by the Georgia Ports Authority, South Carolina Ports Authority, and NACPC would establish a Southern States Chassis Pool. It would be a gray pool but not completely open.

Only NACPC, TRAC, DCLI, and Flexi-Van could contribute to the pool under the proposal presented to the Ocean Carrier Equipment Management Association, which has been skeptical of the idea. Milestone and AIM would be allowed to contribute to the Southern States Chassis Pool because NACPC would handle the invoicing on all transactions and disperse the founds to the appropriate chassis provider.

The real benefit of the Southern States model is at-cost price. Regardless of which chassis is utilized, a flat price would be established for BCOs, likely between $13 and $16 per day based on current pricing.

The two port authorities already oversaw the addition of 4,000 chassis last year, and Georgia will open a new 12-acre chassis yard before this year’s peak.

Assuming control of the problem

“If you are a global logistics director and you have any sort of consistent, measurable volume, you must have your own chassis fleet,” said Andrew Nutting, senior logistics manager with 1A Auto, whose previous stops included Bob’s Discount Furniture and TJX Companies.

Shippers wouldn’t necessarily need to buy their own chassis, which costs between $10,000 and $15,000 per unit. Nutting said having a chassis fleet under their control is the key.

Leasing chassis on a long-term agreement is a popular alternative. Milestone offers such an arrangement, as do most other equipment providers.

DCLI believes a better solution would be building out the digital supply chain platform to track assets. DCLI is an investor in the Blume Global platform, formerly known as REZ-1.

There are immediate benefits for BCOs using their own chassis at marine terminals, which ground containers. Some inland rail terminals mount boxes onto chassis beforehand, so a “flip charge” is assessed to put it on another chassis. Typically it’s about $50 or $100.

“The return on investment for a chassis is less than three years. If you anticipate being in business for the next three years and importing containers, go buy chassis or lease them. It just makes total sense,” Nutting said.

Contact Ari Ashe at ari.ashe@ihsmarkit.com and follow him on Twitter: @arijashe.

 

SOURCE: JOC

Milestone Equipment Holdings - Intermodal Insights: Intermodal Driver Experience Focus Intensifies

Intermodal Insights: Intermodal Driver Experience Focus Intensifies

Throughout the intermodal industry, further enhancing the driver experience is an increasingly important focus.

Executive Vice President Doug Hoehn of Milestone Equipment Holdings stressed that the “most important thing to do for a motor carrier or drive is to provide a good piece of equipment,” and described technological and equipment advancements being made to accomplish that.

“We have taken several steps that help customers and drivers know what equipment is available,” Hoehn said. One of them is an emailed daily utilization report that provides real time information. Another is accessing equipment supply through chassisfinder.com. Fleets and drivers can select equipment on the web or by phone.

GPS Benefits

Another approach in use at some locations, Hoehn said, is equipping chassis with GPS to help managers better understand movement patterns so that utilization can be improved.

Eventually, Hoehn believes that “GPS won’t be something that is an option, but will become almost required equipment” for chassis.

Currently, Hoehn believes that upgrading to radial tires, disc wheels and LED lighting on all company chassis gives drivers the assurance that they won’t have a breakdown. Milestone chose that equipment to make its equipment more attractive to users, compared with the older chassis that might not have those features.

Hoehn said the market is embracing newer chassis as ownership of equipment shifts more toward motor carriers, 3PLs, cargo owners and forwarders who are willing to pay slightly more for equipment with the belief that lower total cost of ownership will be the result. He also favors the trucker choice model.

 

Read the full article 

Milestone Trailer Leasing

Wall Street Journal: Swamped With Inventory, U.S. Companies Turn to ‘Mobile Storage’

U.S. companies are so inundated with inventory that some are renting truck trailers to use for storage space, parking them on warehouse lots or behind storefronts to hold goods until a surge in imports is cleared from crowded distribution hubs.

Transportation equipment lessor Milestone Equipment Holdings launched a “mobile warehousing and storage” business this year to accommodate more customers seeking trailers to hold goods, many of them pulled in from China during 2018 to get ahead of impending tariffs.

The company said Home Depot Inc. and several other major retailers and manufacturers are using the service.

“It’s like a warehouse on wheels,” said Sarah Johnson, who heads up the new mobile storage business at Milestone. “We now think about our trailers as more of a real-estate alternative than just a trailer.”

Read the full story on WSJ here.

Request a Quote here.

 

SOURCE: Wall Street Journal via Erica E. Phillips 

Milestone Trailer Leasing

Milestone Launches National Mobile Warehousing & Storage Product Line

ST. CHARLES, MO (December 12, 2018) – Milestone Equipment Holdings, a national leader in trailer and chassis leasing, is expanding its offerings to include a line of mobile warehousing and storage products. As the only national lessor with dedicated trailers for mobile storage applications, Milestone is positioned to be the industry leader for this kind of offering, with a fleet of 59,000+ trailers of varying specifications, sizes and vintages. This launch is the latest in Milestone’s recent expansions, which have included rapid growth of fleet size and additional locations over the past several years.

In preparation for the launch, Milestone developed a robust infrastructure that included the development of a 15-point quality inspection for the storage assets as well as operational mechanisms that can often deliver assets on site in as little as 24 to 48 hours. Milestone can also provide inexpensive trailer parking at one of its 25 branch locations across the United States if on-site storage space is a challenge.

Forward-Thinking

“We saw an opportunity to use our high-quality fleet to solve space constraints directly related to warehousing shortages and supply chain disruptions; providing expanded access and new solutions for our customers,” said Sarah Johnson, Executive Vice President of Mobile Warehousing and Storage for Milestone. “These forward- and reverse-logistic storage solutions address many of the demands driven by e-commerce, freeing up customers’ equipment. It’s exciting to be the only national single-source provider of this kind of trailer and storage network.”

The product line is comprised of trailers available for cartage, portable or fixed storage; with options that include 53’ or 48’ dry van trailers with roll-up or swing doors and air or spring ride. The services are supported by 25 branches across the country, with a team of dedicated customer service specialists. Milestone can provide flexible terms to address customers’ various volume and commitment needs. The company will also soon offer an enhanced online reservation request system and customer portal, both of which will be available in early 2019.

Opportunity

“In recent years, many companies have struggled with rapidly escalating logistics and warehousing costs, in part driven by the massive growth of e-commerce,” said Milestone CEO Don Clayton. “We worked closely with our customers to develop a product offering that delivers substantial cost savings and flexibility relative to traditional warehousing. Along with the significant investments we continue to make in late model equipment and the expansion of our branch network, we’re positioned to deliver an unparalleled range of solutions to our customers.”

For additional information about Milestone’s Mobile Warehousing & Storage solutions, contact Sarah Johnson at sarah.johnson@milecorp.com or call 636.238.8732. Customers wishing to reserve equipment for mobile storage applications may call their customer service representative or 866.706.1144, email customer.service@milecorp.com.

Sign up for more information here.

 

About Milestone Equipment Holdings, LLC

With a combined fleet of more than 85,000 trailers, chassis and domestic containers, Milestone is one of the nation’s leading and most comprehensive transportation lessors. Founded in 1995 and Headquartered in St. Charles, MO, Milestone’s team of seasoned commercial, operational and customer support professionals provide a broad range of transportation solutions to customers, operating from 60+ locations nationwide.

For more information, please visit: https://www.milecorp.com/

Milestone Chassis - GN-TRI

Transport Topics: Milestone Chassis Expands Footprint in Western, Midwestern Markets

Transportation equipment company Milestone Chassis is looking to address nationwide chassis shortages with several service improvements and two new locations.

New Locations

Milestone has expanded offerings for the Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif., market, including after-hours pickup (5 p.m. or later) and an increase in inventory levels for available equipment types (40-foot gooseneck, 20-foot tri-axels and 20-foot sliders).

To better serve Midwestern markets, Milestone will open locations in Cleveland and Detroit. The former has close proximity to Norfolk Southern and CSX rail ramps, the latter to Norfolk Southern, CSX, CP and CN rail ramps.

“We listened to our customers,” Milestone Executive Vice President Doug Hoehn said in a press release. “We have demonstrated our commitment to being the nation’s premiere intermodal lessor in 2018 — you can expect a continuation of these efforts in 2019. We will continue to evolve our offering in line with market needs.”

 

About Milestone: 

With a combined fleet of approximately 85,000 chassis, trailers and domestic containers – Milestone is one of the nation’s most comprehensive lessors of transportation equipment. Since 1995, we have provided asset management services, financing, maintenance and more to customers that describe us as flexible, trustworthy and customer-centric. Let us optimize your transportation needs!

 

SOURCE: Transport Topics 

Milestone Chassis & HTA

Chassis Inventory Increasing to West Coast, Midwest Locations

Chassis Shortages

To address major chassis shortages nationwide, Milestone Chassis updates and expands offerings on the West Cost and in the Midwest.

In the LA/LB market, Milestone is making the following improvements:

  • Launching after hours pickup (5pm or later)
  • Expanding inventory levels for available equipment types (which include 40’ gooseneck, 20’ tri-axels and 20’ sliders)
  • Continuing to offer HTA discounts that will apply to all after hours bookings

Milestone Chassis will also open two new locations to better serve key markets in the Midwest:

  • Cleveland:
    • Address: 300 E. 131st Street, Cleveland, OH 44108
    • Hours: 7:30am-4:30pm
    • Close proximity to Norfolk Southern & CSX rail ramps
    • Current inventory includes 6×20’ tri-axels (40’ gooseneck chassis to be added soon)
  • Detroit:
    • Address: 8501 W. Fort Street, Detroit, MI 48209
    • Hours: 7:30am-4:30pm
    • Close proximity to Norfolk Southern (onsite rail ramp), CSX, CP & CN rail ramps
    • Current inventory includes 40’ goosenecks, 20’ tri-axels & 20’ sliders

“We listened to our customers,” says Doug Hoehn, Executive Vice President, Milestone Chassis. “We have demonstrated our commitment to being the nation’s premiere intermodal lessor in 2018 – you can expect a continuation of these efforts in 2019. We will continue to evolve our offering in line with market needs.”

 

SOURCE: AJOT

Milestone Chassis & HTA

Milestone Chassis Partners with HTA to Reduce Turn Times

Problem Solvers

Truckers in Southern California who encounter an emergency requirement for a chassis, or wish to supplement their existing fleet during the peak season, can now turn to a joint pool established by the Harbor Trucking Association (HTA) and Milestone Chassis.

With chassis shortages intensifying during the peak shipping season, the HTA, with about 100 member companies in Los Angeles-Long Beach, on Oct. 4 launched its partnership with Milestone to offer members round-the-clock access to a diversified chassis fleet at their combined yard in Wilmington, California.

“It really started to hit in the last couple of weeks,” Doug Hoehn, executive vice president of Milestone, said Wednesday. Chassis shortages and dislocations occur on and off throughout the year in the largest US port complex, but they are especially prevalent during the late summer-autumn peak shipping season.

To read the rest of the story on JOC, click here.

 

SOURCE: Journal of Commerce

Milestone Trailer Leasing

Milestone Expands Its Capabilities in Growing Seattle-Tacoma Market

ST. CHARLES, MO (September 12, 2018) – Responding to growing transportation needs in the Pacific Northwest, Milestone announces its expansion in the Seattle-Tacoma region, effective immediately. In an effort to continuously expand its service offerings to both local and national clients, Milestone is opening the Seattle depot as a key strategic location to service trailer and chassis needs.

“We are excited about this expansion and look forward to delivering creative solutions and outstanding service to our customers throughout the region, while offering more comprehensive services to national accounts with West Coast fulfillment needs,” says Chuck Cannata, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Highway Division at Milestone.

The region’s economic boom and its proximity to the Port of Seattle means a tremendous need in industries including construction, manufacturing and agriculture, among others.

“Seattle is undergoing explosive growth and we want to be a part of that – the opportunities to serve this market are exciting,” says Sarah Johnson, Executive Vice President, Mobile Storage and Warehousing at Milestone. “Our Pacific Northwest customers will have access to Milestone’s nationwide network and a robust mix of 85,000+ pieces of equipment, with our focus on over-the-road needs, as well as mobile storage and chassis.”

Customers interested in accessing equipment for their transportation needs can contact Seattle-Tacoma Account Manager Todd Bring at todd.bring@milecorp.com or (206) 453-9002. For more information, visit milecorp.com/seattle.

For chassis availability at this branch and at Milestone’s existing ConGlobal facility, visit https://www.milecorp.com/chassisfinder.

Milestone Appoints Chuck Cannata, Mike Schiller & Kathy Tierney to Leadership Team

SAINT CHARLES, MO (August 21, 2018) – Milestone is pleased to announce the recent addition of three key executives to its leadership team: Chuck Cannata, Mike Schiller and Kathy Tierney. Cannata, Schiller and Tierney will report directly to Don Clayton, President and Chief Executive Officer.

Chuck Cannata

Chuck Cannata joins Milestone as Executive Vice President for the trailer leasing division, leading the nationwide branch network’s commercial activities, including sales, customer service and field operations. Chuck brings 18 years of commercial equipment finance experience to Milestone, including eight years of sales management and business development at GE Trailer Fleet Services. He is based in Kansas City, KS.

Mike Schiller

Mike Schiller joins Milestone as Senior Vice President of Operations Support, leading key functions such as real estate, vendor management and environmental health & safety. Mike brings 23 years of trailer leasing experience to Milestone, including 21 years of diverse commercial and operations experience at GE Trailer Fleet Services and two years of general management experience at Fleet Trailer Leasing. Mike will be relocating to St. Charles, MO.

Kathy Tierney

Kathy Tierney joins Milestone as Vice President of Human Resources, leading all key HR functions, including recruiting & development, employee relations, payroll & benefits and compliance. Kathy brings 40 years of HR experience to Milestone, including 20 years at First Bank and 20 years at Venture Stores. Kathy is based in St. Charles, MO.

“I am very proud of the outstanding team that we have built by promoting from within and selectively adding outside talent.” says Milestone CEO Don Clayton. “The addition of Chuck, Mike and Kathy will help us continue to grow rapidly, while driving operational excellence in their areas of responsibility. Just as importantly, these additions provide some of our other very talented leaders the bandwidth they need to drive focused strategic initiatives that will contribute to Milestone’s future success.”